Chief Dragon Dive Site

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Chief Dragon is a dive site that is often called Car Wreck, as it is a wreck of a large 112 metre auto transport ship. This is unique dive in the Colombo Harbour, not found in other parts of the world. The ship was broken up into many sections and is now scattered across the floor but excitingly, the main hull has remained upright and intact in one location.

The wreck was sunk in 1982 and was not dived until after the end of the Sri Lankan civil war. Divers can penetrate the wreck in many different sections and there are wonderful discoveries to be found by divers. Many of the old chassis of the cars that were being transported in the wreck are visible and most are scattered around the main deck. This starts at 24 metres and the wreck goes down to 35 metres. The fast currents that exist in the area and these depths means that only advanced divers should attempt this dive site.

The wreck is now covered with many hard and soft corals, and this is then attracting many different types of marine life in huge quantities. Barracuda, mackerel, bannerfish, moray eels and trevally are normal visitors to the wreck. A massive grouper has also moved in and this can be seen on most dives.

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