Astrea Liveaboard

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Climb aboard the Astrea Liveaboard and prepare to be amazed by the wonders of the Galapagos National Park. Suitable for up to 16 guests and spanning a decent length of 25 metres, the Astrea takes its guests on an exciting voyage to explore world-famous sites such as Wolf and Darwin.

The Astrea has a total of 8 air-conditioned cabins, 1 of which is a double room and the others suitable for twin occupancy. Each cabin boasts en-suite bathroom facilities, ample storage space and a reading lamp for added convenience. Indoor communal areas on board include a spacious and comfortable lounge complete with television, library, entertainment system, movies and board games. There is also a sun deck with sun loungers perfect for enjoying the fantastic views. On-board meals are freshly prepared and take the form of popular international dishes as well as traditional dishes from Ecuador. Meals can be ordered a-la-carte with the option of having buffet-style meals in the dining room.

The Astrea’s dive deck is fully equipped with everything divers might need including a rinse tanks, a camera table and plenty of space to store and dry dive gear. A small diving tender accompanies the Astrea, allowing divers to enter the water as close to the action as possible.

Cabins

The Astrea liveaboard boasts 8 great staterooms with en-suite facilities. Each of the staterooms has ample storage and is air-conditioned.

Upper Deck

Cabins 1-4 are twin staterooms which feature a double bed as the lower bunk and a single bed above. The cabins also have a window.

Main Deck

Cabin 5 is the master stateroom which also features a window and a comfortable double bed.

Lower Deck

Cabins 6-8 are twin staterooms that have a double bed on the lower bunk and a single bed above in bunk bed style. The cabins also have a porthole to allow light in.

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